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Queen Elizabeth pays homage to London fire victims in minute of silence

Queen Elizabeth pays homage to London fire victims in minute of silence

In fact, the report is so complimentary about the apartment block's safety standards, it suggests it should be used as a model for a number of other tower blocks.

(AP Photo/Tim Ireland). People demonstrate demanding answers over the Grenfell Tower fire, in London, Friday June 16, 2017.

Commander Stuart Cundy, a spokesman for London's Metropolitan Police, also cautioned there may have been people in the tower that police are not aware of, which would add to the death toll.

The cause of Wednesday's blaze in London is still under investigation, but anger has mounted in the community amid reports that exterior panelling used in an extensive renovation completed past year may have helped the flames to spread. Grief turned to outrage Friday amid reports that materials used in the building's renovation could have fueled the inferno that left dozens dead and missing as it decimated the public housing block.

"I have always said I will be accurate about what I know, so the next figure of those presumed dead and missing will be released tomorrow, Monday 19 June".

A criminal investigation into the Grenfell Tower tragedy is looking into manslaughter charges, Sir Keir Starmer has said.

Cundy said one of the victims was a person who died in hospital.

"Whilst our teams have been from the bottom to the top of the tower, we must now carry out a full forensic and systematic search".

British Prime Minister Theresa May, facing criticism for the government's handling of the disaster, met Saturday with 15 fire survivors invited to her official residence at 10 Downing Street.

The meeting lasted more than two hours Saturday but the group did not speak to reporters gathered outside.

Council leader Nicholas Paget-Brown says questions about how the fatal fire spread so quickly through the tower block "will be answered".

She says "the support on the ground for families who needed help or basic information in the initial hours after this appalling disaster was not good enough".

Around 70 people are missing, according to Britain's Press Association, and identification of the victims is proving very hard.

Police have warned some of the victims may never be identified because of the state of the remains. Officials are using dental records, fingerprints and DNA samples to try to positively identify the victims. A solemn Queen Elizabeth II marked a minute of silence for victims of the London high-rise inferno at the start of a procession Saturday to mark her official birthday.

The 91-year-old monarch said that Britain remains "resolute in the face of adversity" after the horrendous fire and recent extremist attacks in London and Manchester. The queen said it was "difficult to escape a very somber mood" on what is normally a day of celebration.

But when she was asked in an interview on Newsnight on Friday night about whether she had misread the public mood, she sidestepped the question.

London has a chronic housing shortage even in the best of times, and those left homeless by the fire - already angry over what they see as government inequity and incompetence - fear being forced out of the British capital.

Scuffles broke out near the building, with demonstrators chanting "we want justice!" as they surged toward the doors. Survivors of the building claim that cheap materials for the cladding and a lack of maintenance on the building were to blame for the fatal fire.