Economia

UK Brexit minister: Leaving EU won't mean economic isolation

UK Brexit minister: Leaving EU won't mean economic isolation

"But there is more to do as we build an immigration system that delivers the control we need", Goodwill said.

"The British people have sent a very clear message that they want more control of immigration and we are committed to getting net migration down to sustainable levels in the tens of thousands".

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"For example, at least one of the Europeans talking about this has effectively meant a much, much longer negotiation period, whilst other people are concerned about matters such as financial stability".

May has also said she wants an "early agreement" to guarantee the status of the estimated 3 million European Union citizens now living in Britain once exit talks with the European Union begin but will make this conditional on a deal for Britons living in the EU.

Mr Davis, speaking to 400 industry leaders at the dinner in Cardiff on Thursday evening, asked them to be confident about the future as the United Kingdom seeks "not a bitter divorce, but a better relationship" with the EU.

But access to European markets is crucial for business.

She mentioned the structural issue of how the negotiation is being done, in terms of whether it's done in parallel or in series.

Davis, who runs a new government department tasked with overseeing Britain's withdrawal from the European Union, was asked repeatedly by lawmakers during a regular question session in parliament about the prospect of having to contribute to the European Union budget.

He said it was not in anyone's interest to see labour shortages in important industries.

Mr Davis then travelled to south Wales to join a tour of SPTS Technologies, just off the M4, with Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns and Brexit Minister David Jones.

Davis said the reported comments by Johnson "strikes me as completely at odds from what I know about what my right honourable friend believes in this matter".

Alp Mehmet, its vice chairman, told The Times: "Looking ahead, a large proportion of London's population growth will be down to immigration so it's essential that we bring overall numbers down".

But Labour's shadow education secretary Angela Rayner condemned the proposals for "punish [ing] innocent children".

The British government has refused to say whether it will try to stay in the single market after it leaves the bloc.

Davis's comments also come after a document was photographed revealing that the government wanted to "have its cake and eat it" when it came to Brexit.